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How God’s Promises Can Transform You

A whole chapter on God’s promises

When I opened up Joel Beeke and Mark Jones’ book A Puritan Theology: Doctrine for Life I was blown away to see a whole chapter on God’s promises — showing how the promises are essential to trusting and experiencing Christ.

So — since this blog is about living by faith in Jesus Christ — and since faith means trusting all that God PROMISES  to be to us in Christ Jesus — I thought I’d share some quotes.

Why are God’s promises so important?

The promises are the pathways where Christ meets the soul. (p.401)

The promises are instrumental in the coming of Christ and the soul together. (p.401)

Whatever is believed without a promise is only presumed. (p.402)

Nothing is so excellent, so precious, and so sweet as a promise of God. (p.405)

The promises guide and lead us to Christ, for there is not a single promise that does not cry out to us in a loud voice, “O, come to Christ!” and there is no access to Jesus but by a promise. (p.406)

Promises are the objects of faith, through which they feed, nurture, and sustain every other grace. (p.406)

God’s promises are the chief aids to our life and our growth. (p.406)

It is of [great importance to every believer] not to be negligent and careless in the frequent use, and due application of the promises. (p.407)

What is the best way to use God’s promises?

The promises are more useful to us than the air we breathe. (p.407)

[Since] God is behind them as their support and in them as their essential matter, then we have no greater security on earth for heaven and no greater access to the full enjoyment of God than in the divine promises. (p.407)

Few of us really believe [the promises], and few of us can testify about a time when the promises sweetened our bitter afflictions, confirmed our weak and faltering faith under trial, compelled us to duty in the face of adversity, or provided us with unexplainable contentment in a time of disruption and upheaval. (p.407)

While what we have [in Christ] is divinely given, we can enjoy it experientially only by faith.  That faith is not mere assent but an embracing faith by which we cleave to the promises. (p.408)

[Why are our hearts so often] dying within us like a stone, and we are like unto those that are … dead?  Is it not because we do not make use of the promises? (p.409)

True faith [agrees] to the truth of the promise so that it might draw near to Christ and embrace the fruit of the promise, casting itself on Him for life and happiness. (p.409)

[Our problem] is our failure to lean and depend on [the promise] in meditation, to confer with it and chew on it until we feel the sweetness of it in our mouths. (p.411)

Applying the promises means always keeping some specific promises on hand. (p.411)

Praying the promises is the most important element in the right use of the promises. (p.414)

Prayer that is founded on the promises of God, and puts Him in remembrance of them, will more than make up for the deficit of our unbelief, impatience, and doubt. (p.414)

How did these quotes help you?

I’d love to hear — leave a reply below.  Thanks.

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Category: God's Promises

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4 Responses

  1. Paul Walton says:

    “Do not love the world or the things in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him. For all that is in the world—the desires of the flesh and the desires of the eyes and pride of life—is not from the Father but is from the world.”- 1 John 2:15-16

    Regrettably many believers think that great paying job they have is because they are trusting in God’s promise to bless them. Only one problem with that thought, to often all the trappings that come with that healthy income are a curse and not a blessing.

    “The desires of the flesh and the desires of the eyes and the pride of life” that big house, the shiny new import, the great vacation house, those are the things that the world seeks, and we Christians are right there too, only we can put the spin on it that we are just being blessed, and still have the same desires the world does.

    I have to admit I get a little anxious whenever the promises of God are not clearly defined, because too many believers do not understand the true promises being more of Christ’s presence, and not the “blessings” of things.

    Steve I’m not saying that you have not made it very clear in the difference between the two. But I think it is important to constantly point out the true promises.

    • Steve Fuller says:

      Wise words, Paul. Maybe one reason the Puritans did not make this more explicit was because they did not face the emphasis on prosperity theology that we do today.

      But even so, as I read back over the quotes, I noticed that three of them at least imply that the focus of every promise is knowing God in Christ —

      “The promises guide and lead us to Christ, for there is not a single promise that does not cry out to us in a loud voice, “O, come to Christ!” and there is no access to Jesus but by a promise.” (p.406)

      And — “[Since] God is behind them as their support and in them as their essential matter, then we have no greater security on earth for heaven and no greater access to the full enjoyment of God than in the divine promises.” (p.407)

      And — “True faith [agrees] to the truth of the promise so that it might draw near to Christ and embrace the fruit of the promise, casting itself on Him for life and happiness.” (p.409)

      But you are absolutely right that today we need to carefully explain that the focus of all the promises is knowing God in Christ.

      I love your passion for keeping Christ at the center of everything, Paul.

  2. Frank Nees says:

    Asaph said it well….”Nevertheless, I am continually with you; you hold my right hand. You guide me with your counsel, and afterward you will receive me to glory. Whom have I in heaven but you? And there is nothing on earth that I desire besides you. My flesh and my heart may fail, but God is the strength of my heart and my portion forever.” Psalm 73:23-26

    Frank

    • Steve Fuller says:

      So good to hear from you, Frank. And your quotation from Psa 73 is perfect.

      Jan and I loved meeting you and spending time with you and your wife last week.

      May the Father richly bless you with His gracious presence through Christ,

      Steve Fuller

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